GW Libraries: Exhibits

Search

Search using this query type:



Advanced Search (Items only)

Huang Xing

Huang Xing (born Oct. 25, 1874, Changsha, Hunan province—died Oct. 31, 1916, Shanghai), revolutionary who helped organize the Chinese uprising of 1911 that overthrew the Qing dynasty and ended 2,000 years of imperial rule in China. Huang Xing founded the Huaxinghui (“Society for the Revival of China”), a revolutionary group dedicated to the overthrow of the Qing government. After several abortive attempts at revolution, Huang was forced to flee to Japan. In 1905 the revolutionary leader Sun Yat-senorganized the Tongmenghui (“Alliance Society”) as a union of all Chinese revolutionary groups, and Huang was made Sun’s second in command.

Portrait of Huang Xing

Portrait of Huang Xing.

Six years later Huang and his followers, aided by sympathizers among the imperial troops, attempted a military attack on the South China city of Guangzhou (Canton). Because of a lack of coordination among the various units participating in the action, the Guangzhou Uprising, one of the most celebrated events in Chinese revolutionary history, failed. On Oct. 10, 1911, a group of revolutionary-army officers in the central Chinese city of Wuchang began a revolt that soon spread to all parts of South China. With Sun Yat-sen in Europe, Huang was the most important leader on the scene, and he hurried to Wuchang to take charge of the revolutionary forces. In his heroic defense of the central Chinese city of Hanyang, he held off the Qing forces for more than three weeks, giving the revolutionaries time to organize in other parts of the country. On Dec. 2, 1911, the revolutionaries captured Nanjing, in South China, and made it their capital.

Huang Xing with Tongmenghui members

Huang Xing with Tongmenghui members.

On December 14, delegates to the provisional revolutionary government elected Huang generalissimo of the new republic. He declined the appointment, however, and Sun Yat-sen was made provisional president upon his return two weeks later. In March, Sun resigned in favour of the former Qing military commander Yuan Shikai, and the capital was moved to Beijing. Although Huang was offered the premiership and the title general of the army, he refused. Instead, he disbanded his troops and set to work converting the Tongmenghui into a parliamentary political party. By 1913 it had become clear that Yuan was not interested in cooperating with the parliament or obeying the new constitution, and Huang joined with Sun in organizing a new revolution. Yuan’s armies, however, soon crushed the forces of the so-called second revolution, and Huang was forced to flee to Japan and later to the United States. In July 1916, after the death of Yuan, Huang returned to China but died of illness months later.

 

Huang Xing's handwriting

Huang Xing's handwriting.

References:
Huang Xing." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online Academic Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2011. Web. 07 Nov. 2011. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/274344/Huang-Xing>.

Prominent Figures
Huang Xing